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Presentation Summaries

The following program descriptions are from May of 2018.  Session recordings and handouts are available on a pay per view basis.  Contact HealthyIndoors at 603-801-5889 for access.

 

May 01, 2018

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

The Hazards of Microparticulate Pollution and Their Implications for Radically Different Building Design

Presenter:  Fred Gordon, Ph.D., Second Street Associates, Boston, MA

Micro-particulate pollution has been identified as the chief air pollution hazard, and recent Harvard studies have identified it as a major cause of mortality, even at levels formerly considered safe by the DEP.  Passive House buildings are uniquely capable of isolating people from micro-particulates because they’re tight and filter all incoming air. In our new 28 unit Passive House in South Boston, we are developing systems to exclude micro-particulates from the outside, while simultaneously controlling CO2 and VOC’s levels on the inside.  This project involves innovative equipment and controls, and will be extended to our next, adjoining, 38 unit Passive House building.  The combination of Passive House and radical innovations in IAQ defines a new standard in health and comfort which we plan to replicate widely.

Environment:  Homes; Multi-Family

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Cost Effective, High-Performing Building Envelopes

Presenter:  Alan Gibson, Principal, G.O. Logic - Belfast, ME

It is well established that super-insulated, air-tight construction methods, when designed and executed successfully, greatly improve building comfort, health, durability, and energy performance. But are we building them correctly and cost-effectively? This session explores the cutting edge of site-built and pre-fabricated foundation, wall, and roof assemblies for high-performance buildings, with details and products illustrated to sort out the good solutions from the not-so-good. 
 
Proper understanding of the dynamics of thermal and moisture transfer is key to designing durable and healthy building enclosures. This seminar will explain what you need to know to create high-performance and risk-free assemblies with the appropriate building science theory to support it. The session will be illustrated with drawings and photos of real-world construction.  

 

1. Participants will learn the key elements of thermal and moisture physics as they relate to building enclosures.  

2. Participants will learn specific building methods required to achieve passive house or net-zero level buildings, including super-insulated and air-tight building assemblies, high-performance windows and doors, and appropriate mechanicals.  

3. Participants will learn appropriate ventilation strategies to achieve high indoor air quality within an air-tight envelope.  
  
This presentation is best suited to individuals who have experience with building design and energy use standards at an intermediate level. Information will be derived from multiple sources in the building science and passive house arena, with primary emphasis on established methods and readily available materials.  

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Our Homes Suck! And, That’s Why Our Kids Have Sinus Problems

Presented by: Larry Zarker - CEO, Building Performance Institute (BPI), Malta, NY

The Arab Oil Embargo ushered in a prolonged national effort to end America's dependence on foreign energy sources. Incentives were created to encourage homeowners to invest in upgrading the energy efficiency of their homes. Home performance contractors are learning that the key drivers for consumers are health and comfort, not energy efficiency. There is a national epidemic of asthma in the U. S. It is estimated that 1 in 5 cases of asthma can be attributed to factors in the home. Moisture, mold, dust mites, pet and insect dander - to name a few - can negatively impact the health of occupants. Find out how you can deliver healthy home evaluations for your customers.

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Beginner; Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

Crawlspaces: the Illnesses that Lie Beneath

Presented by:  Tim Hebert - Air Purification Specialists, Inc., Pavo, GA

Presentation Summary:  Failed crawlspaces leading to adverse health effects and fatality. 
1) Identifying failed crawlspaces; 2) Designing a testing strategy to identify pathogens present, communicate findings with the treating medical staff to confirm the causative agent in pulmonary fibrosis.

Environment:  Homes, Commercial Buildings

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

Envelope Sealing: Transforming the Way Buildings Are Designed

Presented by:  Neal Walsh, Aeroseal LLC - Centerville, OH

This workshop represents one of the first public presentations providing details on a game-changing approach to envelope sealing developed by the University of 
California. It will examine the role that the building envelope has on IAQ and energy efficiency, review current methods used, and implications that new technologies 
have for the building industry. Attendees of this workshop will (1) gain an understanding of how the building envelope impacts building performance (2) become familiar 
with the pros and cons of current envelope sealing methods, and (3) learn about innovations that could impact the way building are designed and constructed.

Environment:  All buildings

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

HAZMAT Assessments for Renovation/Demolition Projects

Presented by:  Guy Sylvester, CEO and Alison Keith, IAQ Investigator, Absolute Resource Associates - Portsmouth, NH

EPA and OSHA violations aside, neglecting a thorough hazardous materials inspection can have devastating financial, legal, health and environmental impacts for all parties involved. Determining what is a hazardous waste is paramount, because only those wastes that have specific attributes are subject to regulation. In this session, led by IAQ expert Guy Sylvester, CEO of Absolute Resource Associates, you will learn about what is and what is not considered hazardous waste, what's involved in HAZMAT assessments and surveys, how to conduct a physical inspection of a building, and learn how to identify contaminants such as Asbestos, Lead Paint, PCBs, Mercury and Mold. Learn how hand held instruments such as the X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzer are priceless tools for an investigation, acceptable state and federal analysis methods, the roles of the consultant and remediator, and much more.

Environment:  All

Presentation Level:  TBA

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

10:00 - 11:00 a.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Radon: The Leading Environmental Cause of Cancer Mortality

Presented by R. William Field, Ph.D., M.S. University of Iowa College of Public Health - Iowa City, IA

The presentation will focus on the sources of radon exposure and how an individual can reduce the risk posed by radon.  In addition, the underlying science that supports the risk estimates for radon as well as national and global efforts to educate the public about radon will also be presented.    

Environment:  All

Presentation level:  TBA

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.; Massachusetts Room (Lobby level)

Hot Topics in Indoor Air Quality

Presenter:  Carl Grimes, Managing Director, Hayward Healthy Home Institute - Denver, CO

This session will cover three, cutting-edge issues in Indoor Air Quality in 2018:

  1. The movement is toward an ever increasing spread of topics associated with IAQ. Especially with the Microbiome of the Built Environment (MOBE) funded by the Sloan Foundation for the past 5 years. The newest project is Indoor Chemistry – especially the micro-film on surfaces composed of water soluble organics.

  2. Climate change is becoming an increasing hot topic. Not just for the damage caused by storms and other extreme events, but how the building characteristics need to shift along with the climate.

  3. Silos – Many organizations continue to stay within their own “bubble,” resisting inclusion with other points of view. Although there are some efforts to change, progress is very slow due to a lack of appreciation of how to proceed. Two factors are identified and discussed.

Environment:  All Buildings

Presentation Level:  Basic

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Keynote Presentation - Bridging the Gap! The Search for a Better Way to Build

Presenter:  Tedd Benson, Bensonwood & Unity Homes

Secure​ ​housing​ ​is​ ​the​ ​root​ ​and​ ​stalk​ ​of​ ​civilization,​ ​and​ ​one​ ​of​ ​the​ ​three​ ​principle​ ​physical aspects​ ​(food,​ ​clothing,​ ​shelter)​ ​that​ ​are​ ​essential​ ​in​ ​the​ ​quality​ ​of​ ​our​ ​lives.​ ​Yet​ ​the​ ​current American​ ​standard​ ​more​ ​often​ ​than​ ​not​ ​results​ ​in​ ​a​ ​highly​ ​defective,​ ​regressive, under-performing​ ​product,​ ​one​ ​that​ ​shows​ ​a​ ​dramatic​ ​lack​ ​of​ ​progress​ ​relative​ ​to​ ​so​ ​many advances​ ​in​ ​other​ ​sectors​ ​of​ ​modern​ ​life.​ ​For​ ​too​ ​long,​ ​we've​ ​been​ ​an​ ​under-performing industry,​ ​and​ ​need​ ​to​ ​build​ ​much​ ​better​ ​products​ ​for​ ​the​ ​sake​ ​of​ ​homeowners​ ​and​ ​the​ ​planet.​ ​If we’re​ ​going​ ​to​ ​house​ ​ourselves​ ​in​ ​the​ ​manner​ ​that​ ​reflects​ ​the​ ​hopes,​ ​demands​ ​and​ ​capabilities of​ ​the​ ​21st​ ​century,​ ​then​ ​we​ ​need​ ​to​ ​change​ ​nearly​ ​everything​ ​about​ ​how​ ​we​ ​go​ ​about​ ​designing and​ ​building​ ​homes.​ ​Thankfully,​ ​the​ ​solutions​ ​exist,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​path​ ​from​ ​homebuilding's​ ​current stagnation​ ​to​ ​potential​ ​revolutionary​ ​improvement​ ​isn't​ ​too​ ​complicated.​ ​It's​ ​just​ ​hard.​ ​It's​ ​a​ ​shift of​ ​culture​ ​and​ ​technology.​ ​From​ ​shiftless​ ​to​ ​proud;​ ​from​ ​analog​ ​to​ ​digital,​ ​the​ ​future​ ​is​ ​available now.  

 


Attendees will hear about:

1.​ ​​Open​ ​Building​. ​This​ ​may​ ​be​ ​one​ ​of​ ​the​ ​top​ ​2​ ​or​ ​3​ ​attributes​ ​of​ ​sustainable,​ ​long-life​ ​buildings,​ ​yet​ ​very​ ​few building​ ​professionals​ ​have​ ​ever​ ​heard​ ​about​ ​it. 
 

2.​ ​​What​ ​is​ ​dimensional​ ​coordination, ​​and​ ​how​ ​can​ ​it​ ​make​ ​building​ ​design​ ​better​ ​and​ ​good​ ​architecture​ ​in​ ​residential​ ​building​ ​more democratic? 
 

3.​​ ​I​ntegrated​ ​Building​ ​Elements​. A​ ​process​ ​that​ ​results​ ​in​ ​more​ ​value​ ​added​ ​effort​ ​being​ ​aggregated​ ​into​ ​fewer​ ​components​ ​in the​ ​building​ ​process. 
 

4.​ ​​Montage​ ​Design​ ​&​ ​​ ​Building. Part​ ​of​ ​a​ ​lexicon​ ​for​ ​a​ ​better​ ​way​ ​to​ ​build.​ ​Attendees​ ​will​ ​gain​ ​an​ ​understanding​ ​about​ ​the logic​ ​behind​ ​designing​ ​and​ ​manufacturing​ ​elements​ ​and​ ​assemblies;​ ​then​ ​designing​ ​and building​ ​by​ ​montage​ ​(assembly). 

Environments:  Homes

Presentation Level:  For All

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

Solar & Batteries: Technology on the Bleeding Edge

Presenter:  Hans Albee, Revision Energy - Portland, Maine

In the midst of increasing storms, natural disasters and potential threats to our grid,  back up power and emergency centers are becoming more important for people to be able to remain safe during the time of a prolonged power outage. Buildings need to plan to be resilient in these times, one way to do this is through the advanced technologies of solar energy and battery storage. ReVision Energy, in partnership with Tesla and Pika Energy, is pushing the new and rapid progression and cost reduction of battery installations. This technology is now making it practical for everyone to explore the combination of a solar electric system with modern battery storage options.

 

As a group, Lithium Ion batteries have some significant advantages over most other contemporary battery technologies which have made them virtually ubiquitous in our portable electronics (phones, tablets, laptops) and also, more recently, in electric vehicles. Most notable amongst those advantages is that compared to other technologies they tend to be have relatively high energy and power density. Tesla and Pika Energy represent just a handful of the increasingly competitive residential and small commercial energy storage space. ReVision Energy continues to work collaboratively with a variety of manufacturers and developers of products to help identify which are the most robust and cost effective solutions for New England’s climate energy needs.

 

Because storage is a critical part of the large-scale transition to renewable energy, every solar electric system can be designed and installed today with ‘forward compatible’ storage, whether or not a battery pack is installed at the time of the solar installation. Not only can batteries keep the lights on when the sun or grid is down, but they can also support the utility grid by filling intermittent gaps in renewable energy production when clouds pass over or wind subsides. For the planet’s sake, as well as that of our local economies, we need as rapid a transition to renewable energy as possible. The technology is here, and it’s the onus on regulators and legislators to modernize policy such that these technologies can fairly compete in the regulated monopoly of the electric grid.

Environments:  Homes & Commercial Buildings

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Improving IAQ: A Simple Approach to Optimizing Product Selection

Presenters:  Jim Newman, Ellie Hoyt, and Kelsey Powers - Linnean Solutions, Cambridge MA

Traditional strategies for improving indoor air quality (IAQ) rarely consider the toxicity of specific interior products, and instead attempt to improve air quality by increasing ventilation rates, which consequently increases the building’s energy consumption. Our presentation will walk through a project-specific IAQ process focused on selecting materials that limit harmful emissions, such as VOCs. This method is a useful tool to help designers produce healthier indoor environments for occupants along with operational savings over the lifetime of the building. We will also explore the limitations of this process, including the lack of transparency in product emissions information and how they currently prevent designers
from making informed decisions when specifying low-emitting interior products.

 

As well as a verbal explanation, we will also demonstrate the project-specific tool we created. This will provide participants a more well-rounded understanding of how the VOC emissions rates of products truly affect IAQ, the importance of accurate data, and the limitations we found to inhibit further development of the tool, thus far.

 

Three key concepts participants will learn:

  1. A project-specific interior materials selection process developed to improve indoor air quality while optimizing ventilation rates.

  2. The limitations to the material/product decision-making process.

  3. Next steps that we think will help the advance these methods.

 

Our intended audience includes designers, building owners, architects, and engineers. Each profession will gain something different, yet valuable, from our presentation. For example, designers may gain a better understanding of how products can affect the occupants’ well-being, whereas engineers may find the method of addressing IAQ via material choice instead of increased ventilation rates to be beneficial. Our session is intended for both basic and intermediate level audiences. Though the topics we discuss can be inherently technical, the presentation itself will be a more basic summary of our findings and thoughts.

Environments:  Homes & Commercial Buildings

Presentation Level:  Basic and Intermeidate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Introduction to Risk Communications & Conflict Resolution: Dealing Smartly with an IEQ Emergency

Presenter:  Mike McGuinness, CIH, CET, CIAQP, R.K. Occupational & Environmental Analysis, Inc. – Phillipsburg, NJ

Given the fact that performing IEQ investigations involves assessment of environmental health stressors in the built environment and their potential risks to occupants, elements of risk communication will almost certainly be involved in the process if risks are identified in the assessment process. Therefore it is imperative that not only must IEQ practitioners be grounded in risk assessment and risk management principles but they must also be able to effectively communicate risk if they are to be considered competent professionals. The importance of being able to effectively and honestly communicate and discuss risk cannot be overstated. Diverse groups may be considered “interested parties” that are vested in the results of a given IEQ investigation. These parties may include building occupants or their representatives, parents or relatives of occupants, building owners or managers, insurers, allied investigators or medical personnel, regulators, the public and in some cases, the media.

 

Building investigations may involve responding to “IEQ emergencies” where occupants either evacuate a “problem” facility or refuse to enter a building until and unless the causes of their health issues are discovered and addressed. Poor or lack of response on the part of building owners/managers to occupant concerns may elicit feelings of distrust, disrespect or disgust in occupants, parents or the media. A skillful risk communicator has the ability to reduce tensions, relieve anxiety and effect appropriate changes in not only how a building is operated and maintained but also in forming an effective program of conflict resolution and a proactive, on-going program of complaint response and decision-making involving all concerned parties. 

 

This session will discuss tried and true methods to address stakeholders’ concerns, reduce conflict and hysteria, develop and implement a strategy to accomplish the stated goals and achieve a successful resolution to the “emergency."

Environment:  All

Presentation Level:  TBA

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

How to Avoid Failures in Spray Foam Installations That Can Lead to Serious IAQ Problems

Presenter:  Henri Fennell, H.C. Fennell Consulting, LLC - North Thetford, VT

This program introduces the most common causes of problems in field-applied polyurethane foam installations and presents guidelines for assuring product quality, thus avoiding related indoor air quality issues.  Discussion addresses quality control during and immediately after the installation, and how basic inspections and on-site tests are used to verify product quality.  Finally, how requiring critical product documentation can prevent foam installation failures is presented.  Case studies provide examples of problem foam installations that caused indoor air quality concerns and demonstrate how quality control measures could have prevented these problems. 
Learning Objectives: 
1. Participants will be able to plan their projects so as to avoid typical problems and failures in spray foam installations. 2. Participants will know what indicators of product quality to look for and how to perform on-site testing for product density, adhesion, pass thickness, and dimensional stability. 3. Participants will be able to require installers to provide a comprehensive set of submittals that will help assure a safe installation of spray foam in their future projects. 4. Participants will be able to verify that installers achieve the minimum processing parameters that spray foam manufacturers intend. 

 

Environment:  Residential & Commercial

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.; Connecticut Room Lobby Level

Fundamentals of Formaldehyde & Formaldehyde Analysis

Presenter:  Steve Froelicher, Ph.D. - Prism Analytical Technologies, Mt. Pleasant, MI

This presentation is designed for professional home inspectors, CIH, etc. to introduce them to the complexity of IAQ issues associated with the presence of formaldehyde.  Formaldehyde is difficult to avoid because it is present in ambient air, so the key is to reduce or minimize indoor sources.

Formaldehyde causes respiratory irritation.  Understanding exposure levels is difficult because different agencies suggest different limits.  Finally, several methods will be described to enable  analyzing for formaldehyde in indoor environments.

Environment:  Residential & Commercial

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Strategies for Remediating IAQ Problems Related to Improperly Processed Spray Foam

Presenter:  Henri Fennell, H.C. Fennell Consulting - North Thetford, VT

This program would introduce the means of determining which types of foam problems are present in a given project and when the foam material can be repaired vs. when it has to be partially or completely removed and replaced.  It includes strategies for remediating each type of the foam material problem, including the new SFC guidance document on removal methods. Case studies provide examples of problem foam installations and the associated remediation work.   This program can be combined with “Inspecting foam plastic installations” which introduces the inspection and diagnostic processes to extend a Workshop into a 2 or 3-hour Seminar. 
 
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to identify typical problems and failures in foam installations. 2. Participants will be able to differentiate between foam that should be removed and replaced and foam that only needs to be repaired. 3. Participants will be able to select the appropriate remediation strategies for problem foam installations. 4. Participants will be able to identify the best method for repairing anomalous defects in foam installations that are otherwise within acceptable limits. 

 

Environment:  Residential & Commercial

Presentation level:  Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

The Role of the Indoor Environment in Managing Children's Health

Presenter:  Kevin Kennedy, Director Environmental Health Program, Children's Mercy Kansas City - Kansas City, MO

You’ve all heard it before. Children spend 90% of their time indoors. In the US this means they spend 90% of their time directly exposed the whatever materials, particles, and chemicals the building is made of, managed by, and oozing with. Chronic diseases in children have been increasing for decades and the connection to exposure to things in their homes and schools has become clearer with improved knowledge and better research. So, what are we going to do about it? In this session, we’ll discuss what we know about indoor environmental exposure and health impacts in children, and effective interventions to reduce or eliminate exposure to contaminants in order to improve their health.


After this session attendees will:

  1. Be able to describe the 3 most common issues in buildings that are associated with Chronic health problems in children.

  2. Understand common contaminant pathways that lead to exposure to contaminants in buildings

  3. Be able to identify several interventions that are effective at reducing exposure to indoor contaminants

 

Environment: Homes, Schools, Childcare Centers

Presentation: Basic and Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

Breathe Easy! Design Your Buildings So Your Clients Can

Presenter:  Karla Butterfield, Sustainability  Director, Steven Winter Associates - Norwalk, CT

Join this presentation for an in-depth investigation into the design and construction of air tight, energy efficient, exceptionally comfortable buildings. Air tight construction can be achieved through many different materials and components; the key is an identified air barrier that is continuous with intentional, well-sealed penetrations. Unintended gaps in an air barrier can be the result of poor design details and/or poor quality of construction which can compromise a structure’s durability.

Every building, whether airtight or not, needs a properly designed, installed and functioning ventilation system. Plentiful fresh clean air at comfortable temperatures needs to be provided to the occupants year round. Infiltrated air (air that has leaked in through gaps in the building envelope) cannot be the primary source of make-up air in a high performing building.

Indoor air is typically two to five times more polluted than outdoor air, according to the EPA. With people spending 90% of their time indoors, indoor air quality ranks in the top five environmental risks to human health.  As energy-efficient homes have tighter building envelopes with less air infiltration, indoor air quality deteriorates without proper ventilation and consideration of building materials and finishes. This is especially true in winter months, when less outdoor air enters the home and the concentrations of contaminants we are exposed to increases.

We can choose to design and construct without chemicals that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are carbon-based chemicals which become gaseous at room temperature. Common VOCs include methane, benzene and methyl chloride. Some are known to cause short- and long-term health effects. VOCs are released from thousands of products, including paints, cleaning supplies, air fresheners, personal care products, building materials, lacquers, adhesives and permanent markers. One group of VOCs is toluene diisocyanates (TDIs) which are found in numerous products, including coatings, adhesives and sealants. Along with ventilation, specifying no VOC alternatives for durable, affordable construction materials and finishes is key to good indoor air quality.

While thoughtful design and construction can result in a high performing, comfortable building, that doesn’t mean it will. Occupant behavior will affect performance and durability, therefore education and training along with systems monitoring is critical so everyone can breathe easy long after occupancy.

Environment:  Residential & Commercial

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Great Schools! Energy Efficiency & IAQ CAN Go Hand in Hand!

Barry Stephens, Northeast Regional Sales Manager, Ventacity Systems, Inc. Portland OR

Through a detailed study of existing methods of providing HVAC to their schools, the NYC School Construction Authority established a base to determine a better way forward. What they developed is a triple-win approach; 1) Lower first costs, 2) Reduced energy use  3) Better IAQ through better 

ventilation strategies. 

This presentation will detail the existing systems, and then address elements that allowed for reducing cost and energy use, and achieving an outcome

of better learning environments for students through optimized, controlled ventilation. 

Environment:  Mid-size and Large Buildings

Presentation Level:  Basic-Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

High-Performance Means Nothing if Consumers Don’t Buy It: 7 Proven Strategies for Behavior Change

Sam Rashkin, Chief Architect, Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy - Washington, D.C.

There are seven tried-and-true principles for changing behavior, yet it’s surprising how often we neglect them when promoting high-performance buildings. It’s like throwing away a critical business asset. The Zero Energy Ready Home Program has rigorously applied all seven strategies to push a very heavy ‘zero’ up a very steep hill. Learn how to effectively promote high-performance homes more effectively with these seven strategies.

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Basic-Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 01, 2018

4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

Every Home Can Be Healthier! EPA Resources That Improve IAQ in New & Existing Homes

Presented by:  Cindy Wasser, Senior Associate, ICF

 

During this presentation, attendees will 1) Gain familiarity with EPA’s priorities related to indoor environmental contaminants; (2) Identify  resources available to support professionals in addressing occupant health and indoor environmental contaminant issues in homes; and (3) Hear about opportunities to participate in existing and new home labeling programs that distinguish homes that are efficient, durable, and healthier for residents.

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Basic

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

Improved IAQ & HVAC: Load Reduction with Sorbent Technology - Part 1

Presenter:  Charles Gans, Johnson Controls, Inc. - Collegeville, PA

Presentation will include an overview of IMC and ASHRAE 62.1 outside air requirements.  Strategies for reducing outside through ASHRAE 62.1 IAQP method and implementation of adsorbent technologies to improve IAQ and reduce energy costs will be reviewed. Additional topics will include Demand Control Ventilation and ASHRAE 62.1 VRP method along with the application of USGBC LEED Pilot Program EQpc 68 for indoor air quality. The goals of the presentation will be for participants to gain an understanding of current methods available for calculation of outside air requirements, the impact of the methods on indoor air quality and energy costs and how sorbents can be applied to reduce HVAC loads and improve IAQ.

Agenda

  • International Mechanical Code(IMC) and ASHRAE

  • ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure(VRP) and Indoor Air Quality Procedure(VRP)

  • Prescriptive vs. Performance Design methods

  • IAQP Momentum

    • Added to ASHRAE 62.1

    • Added to IMC

    • USGBC Pilot Program EQpc68 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    •  IAQP Moves from one page in ASHRAE 2013 to 30 pages in 2016

  • Ventilation Rate Procedure Review

  • Demand Control Ventilation

  • Sample Outside Air Calculation using IAQP

  • (IAQP) Air Cleaning Solutions

  • Outside Air Comparisons Using VRP , DCV, & IAQP

Environments:  Large Buildings

Presentation Level:  Intermediate; Advanced

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Efficient, All-Electric Homes: Moving To Zero-Energy

Presenters:  Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates, Norwalk CT; Phil Kaplan, Kaplan Thompson Architects - Portland, Maine

With well-insulated envelopes and newer heat pumps that work even in cold climates, more designers and builders are moving away from fossil fuels towards all-electric buildings. When does this really make sense? What about comfort and reliability? How efficient are these systems really?

 

Speakers will present case studies where designers chose to forego on-site fossil fuels. Some of these homes approach (or achieve) zero net energy with on-site PV. The session will also cover research on system performance, new technologies to consider, and best practices for incorporating air-source heat pumps (both for water heating and space heating).
 

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Avoiding a Bad "Wrap"

Presenter:  Willaim  A. Turner, M.S., P.E. - Turner Building Science & Design - Harrison, ME

New and Retrofit construction of building walls often includes materials to control or reduce air and moisture migration through the wall assembly. The Northeast USA is one of the more difficult climate zones to design and build walls that are unlikely to experience water damage. This session will build on the underlying reasons that various types of failures have occurred, and focus on conveying the basic principles of robust wall construction, with examples, that are proven to work well in cold and wet climates. It will draw on and convey web resources that participants should be able to access to expand their knowledge to reduce call backs for water damage in walls, and improve occupant comfort.

Proposed Learning Objectives:  after attending this session, attendees will be able to:
 

1. Identify web resources to further advance their knowledge regarding this topic.

2. Identify the factors that make the certain Climates and types of construction a difficult challenge regarding wall construction.

3. Identify the 7 key parts of a wall system that must work well to reduce the likelihood of water damage in a healthy building with insulated, high performance wall.

4. Identify construction details that may eventually come to Maine that will require builders to change historic practices to create modern durable wall systems that work well.

Environment:  Residential & Commercial

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

Introduction to Microparticulates, Mold Testing, and Spore Trap Analysis

Presenter:  Thomas Cheetham, Ph.D.; Senior Microbiologist, Northeast Laboratory Services - Winslow, ME

 

A profusely illustrated discussion of mold spores and other bioaerosols in the indoor environment with emphasis on collection and laboratory analysis of spore trap data. Topics include: Bioaerosol Sources and Dispersal; Basic Biology of Mold; Mold and Indoor Humidity; Laboratory Preparation and Analysis of Spore Traps; Interpreting Spore Trap Data Sheets; Data Analysis Guidelines; Case Studies. There will be ample time for questions and discussion.

Environment:  All Buildings

Presentation Level:  Basic

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

10:00 a.m. -11:00 a.m. EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

Improved IAQ & HVAC: Load Reduction with Sorbent Technology - Part 2

A continuation of the 8:30 - 9:30 a.m. session.

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Particle Behavior and Particle Counting for IAQ Applications

Presented by:  Thomas Grillo, ParticlesPlus - Stoughton, MA

This presentation covers aspects of particulate in the indoor air environment, their behavior and how they can be quantified.  It also covers multiple types of particle detection, sampling and counting for IAQ applications.  

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms

Issues with Insulation! (Foam, Fiberglass, & Cellulose)

Presenter:  Jeff May, May Indoor Air Investigations - Tyngsborough, MA

There have been problems associated with spray polyurethane foam (SPF) installations in homes. This presentation will look at some of the chemical features of SPF components and some of the health issues associated with SPF, including dust exposure; and will include some suggestions on report writing. The presentation will also illustrate problems associated with fiberglass and cellulose installations, including improper installation that can lead to heat loss and mold and odor problems. Some remediation options and case studies will be included. How to recognize problem installations through visual inspection is a primary learning objective of this presentation.
 

Environment:  All Buildings

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

Resolving IAQ Problems Through Occupant Participation

Presenter:  Scott Lawson, The Lawson Group - Concord, NH

This session presents a less technical, occupant-based model for solving indoor air quality issues that is not only successful, but also less expensive, than a traditional, extensive testing model.  This process generally leaves occupants happy with the resolution of the problem instead of baffled, confused, or worse:  angry.

Environment:  All

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

11:15 a.m. - 12:00 Noon EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Keynote Presentation: Two for the Price of One! Energy Efficiency Provides Environmental AND Health Benefit

Presenter:  Ellen Tohn, Principal at Tohn Environmental Strategies and Assistant Professor of Practice at Brown School of Public Health

We know that efficiency efforts reduce energy use, lower energy bills, and can reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Research now tells us that residents can also experience health benefits, with fewer asthma and respiratory issues, and improved general physical and mental health. The benefits are greatest among lower income households, who also experience greater health risks. The time is right for a greater investment in energy efficiency, leveraging that workforce to improve health. 

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

The Case for Commissioning

Presenters:  Mike Chonko, P.E./CEM and Greg Burgess,  LEED AP, CEM, CxA - SMRT Inc., Portland, ME

Today’s buildings are ever changing environments requiring flexibility to adapt to occupant ventilation and thermal requirements. Each building system must meet or exceed their perform objectives while being fully maintainable by the user and meet prescribed energy objectives.  
 
The commissioning process bridges the gaps between trades and facilitates a completed installation by assuring integration, set-up, and programming are complete. Final acceptance verifications are performed to “test” system performance against design expectations.  

 

Environment:  Larger Buildings

Presentation Level:  Basic

Post-Conference Video Recording Available


 
This presentation is intended to help building owners, designers, and contractors understand the commissioning process through illustration and lessons learned.   

 

May 02, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Zero Made Easy - Part 1

Presenter:  Sam Rashkin, Chief Architect Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy - Washington, D.C.

Make no mistake about it. The vast innovation imperative transforming every industry is coming to a housing industry near you...soon! This is because your buyers are growing exponentially smarter. Lowest cost per square foot will no longer close the deal.  And we haven’t even begun to talk about the new risks confronting builders as energy codes have reached the building science tipping point...the point where homes can no longer dry if they get wet, get wet easier, provide less fresh air, experience longer swing seasons, and require much less air flow for heating and cooling.  Zero is the answer…DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes that dramatically reduce risk and vastly exceed buyers’ expectations. This includes a whole new level of affordability, comfort, health, safety, durability and quality. American homebuyers want this level of excellence when they make the largest investment of a lifetime. They just don’t know it’s available and how to get it… yet. This session will provide an overview of the Zero Energy Ready Home program including the business case, general specifications, and opportunities to be recognized as an industry leader. 

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Basic-Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.; New Hampshire Room, Lobby Level

What Do 10,000 Homes Tell Us?

Presenter:  Carl Grimes, Managing Director, Hayward Healthy Homes Institute - Denver, CO

A free web-based questionnaire asks residential occupants basic questions about the physical attributes of their home. Such as do they have a basement or crawlspace, forced air system and where it is located. Also activity questions such as how often they vacuum and if it is with a HEPA vac; do they run the bathroom exhaust fan during long showers; do they store pesticides and other chemicals in the garage, basement, or crawlspace. They are also asked to indicate any complaints or symptoms they are aware of.

 

A custom algorithm generates a score between 1 and 100, then identifies major issues affecting their scores, plus recommendation for improvement – including detailed action plans and maintenance plans.

 

Currently no large scale data base exists for this information so the characteristics of homes is not comprehensively known. Neither are the activities of occupants than can affect their health and wellbeing.

 

Initial analysis includes frequency and comparisons of houses by climate zone; how people use their homes; how they perceive complaints they attribute to their homes; and future research questions are being identified.

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Basic

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

Diagnostic Tools & Techniques for Healthy Building Inspections

Joe Medosch, Healthy Building Scientist, Hayward Score - Cumming, GA

The Healthy Home Evaluator credential is the newest credential and will become The new standard for evaluating homes. This session will expand the vision of auditors and technicians to show that the majority of their findings and corrections are the basis of the Healthy Home Evaluator credential. This session will be a case based presentation and have interactive exercises that go thru several areas of a home with the standard auditors vision and then expand the scope to include what a HHE is assessing and reporting on. The overlap will be obvious and provide confidence for any auditor that they can perform a Healthy Home Assessment.

 

Auditors are performing Healthy Home assessments and observing the conditions everyday, they are just not documenting the findings. Loose handrails, trip hazards, insects & pests and similar conditions are common conditions in any home. Just not part of an energy work scope report. These are all part of the HUD "Keep-It" principles in Healthy Homes. We will provide an overview of an assessment and cover the Healthy Home Principles that most technicians have not been trained on - until now!

 

This is a visual comparison vs a knowledge base or fundamentals.

Session will visually detail the differences in what an Auditor vs HHE will observe in a kitchen, childs bedroom, bathroom, family room and HVAC system.

Includes interactive visual exercises and discussions.

 

The session will cover: Overview of: Healthy Home Evaluator, assessment, some of the tools & techniques of HHE, findings - communicating, documenting and recommendations.

 

This workshop is co-sponsored by HHEA - Healthy Home Environment Association.

HHEA is a nonprofit organization that supports Healthy Home Professionals.

 

Learning Objectives:

- Difference and overlap between energy audit and healthy home assessment

- Apply the key principles in healthy home assessments

- Applying the tools and techniques of a healthy home assessment

- How to identify some of the top health risks and provide solutions to the occupants. 

- How to filter all the health risks into a coherent report

- How to prioritize possible health risks. 

 

Key Concepts:

Similarities and differences between energy audit and healthy home assessment

The micro / macro vision that a healthy home assessment has.

Environment:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Basic, Intermediate, Advanced

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST; Connecticut Room (Lobby Level)

Better by Half: Improving IAQ While Cutting Business Energy by 50%

Marcus Jones, Engineering Specialist & Energy Consultant, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation - Burlington, VT

Improving indoor air quality in the buildings of small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) is a welcome benefit of significant improvements to energy performance. In fact, this benefit can help energy efficiency business customers come more quickly to a yes decision on proceeding with “deep energy retrofits.” The mutual exchange of benefits—better air quality and savings on energy costs—can help drive market sectors toward better health and greater energy savings. This is especially attractive for hard-to-reach markets, and the debt- and risk-averse SMB sector is one of them. To increase the value proposition, an energy efficiency utility in Vermont tested the extent to which its SMB customers could and would want to cut their energy use by an unheard-of amount: 50 percent.

 

This workshop presentation describes the project research, answering questions on customer willingness to invest time and withstand construction disruptions to achieve lower energy use and the improved productivity and health benefits from deep energy retrofits. It examines economic viability for SMB owners who classically operate with tight margins—and who comprise a large percentage of a rural state’s business economy.

 

The intended audience is primarily energy engineers and other energy efficiency program professionals, construction industry representatives, lenders, and SMB owners and facilities managers. Attendees will learn about (1) making the reduction of barriers Priority 1 in designing an “It can’t be done” project; (2) the art of not selling the project, but understanding the effects of the project, in advance, on the customer; and (3) the importance of tying all benefits from the project, including quantifying the health benefits, to the value proposition. These concepts can be particularly valuable to the targeted professionals in their general work, too, while deepening their understanding of energy efficiency program functions, goals, and local economic influences.

Environment:  Mid-Large Commercial

Presentation Level: Intermediate

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST; Rhode Island Room (Lobby Level)

Zero Made Easy - Part 2

A continuation of the 1:30-2:30 session with Sam Rashkin

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Interventions for Reducing Exposures to Particulate Matter

Presenter:  Terry Brennan, Building Scientist & Educator, Camroden Associates - Westmoreland, NY

There are lots of health studies that link particle levels in outdoor air to lung and heart disease.  Both the kind of illnesses that make everyday life more difficult and the kind that take months or years off the end of your life. Oddly, most of our exposure to particles that originate outdoors happens indoors.  Two reasons: we’re indoors most of the time; and a whole lot of outdoor air particles find their way inside.  Typically around half of the particles in indoor air came in from outside.  The good news is that a lot can be done to lower exposure to particles inside your house.  Air sealing, filtering the ventilating air, filtering the indoor air.  Things you have the power to make happen in your own home, your family’s, or the homes, schools, and commercial buildings of customers.  It turns out there are studies that give us an idea of how effective some of the strategies are.  

Environment:  Homes and Commercial Buildings

Presentation Level:  Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST; Massachusetts Room (Lobby Level)

What Happens in the Bedroom Stays in the Bedroom

Housing trends over the last 4 decades have continued to improve the energy efficiency of the building shell. Improvements in methods, materials and workmanship have all resulted in greatly reducing the energy loss carried by airflow from the inside to the outside. The results have left some rooms full of pollutants. According to the EPA, indoor air quality can be 100 more polluted than the air outside. Strategies to effectively deal with this issue have largely failed in many area because the approach has been to look at the home as one big area and not address individual rooms. Running bathroom fans, kitchen fans and whole house fans may reach a given air exchange rate and satisfy a standard, but does it actually ventilate all the rooms. In fact, does it ventilate maybe the most important room, the bedroom?

This session will look at the history of ventilation and how the ASHRAE 62.2 ventilation standard was developed, up to the current version of 62.2 2016. We will look at old studies that support the current ventilation standard and what was being considered. Then recent studies that show the effect of ventilation on health and performance. Also, one of the most recent studies showing results from the bedroom and the pollutants that linger there. Finally, effective strategies and volumes to equip the homeowner to solve the problem. 

Environments:  Homes

Presentation Level:  Basic, Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

Post-Conference Video Recording Available

May 02, 2018

4:15 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. EST; Vermont/New Hampshire Rooms (Lobby Level)

Dilution is Not the Solution to Indoor Pollution

Joseph Lstiburek, B.A.Sc., M.Eng., Ph.D., P.Eng., Principal, Building Science Corporation - Boston, MA and ASHRAE Fellow

Dilution ventilation is unreliable, ineffective and energy intensive.  It should only be used to address bioeffluent from people.  Yes, people stink.  They are evaporatively cooled unvented combustion appliances.  Source control does not work for people….but it works for everything else.  Eons ago…the seventies….after Elvis... most of us knew that you ventilate for people not for the building. Source control for the building…dilution ventilation for the occupants.  We have forgotten how to do source control and we are over-ventilating buildings.  The ventilation rates are based on politics not health science and lead to excessive dryness in cold climates resulting in a need for humidification and excessive wetness in hot humid climates resulting in a need for dehumidification. This is insane.  Source control is much more than following a LEED checklist for materials…it involves real architecture and real mechanical engineering and real construction for both residential and commercial structures.  This presentation examines how we got to where we are….and where we have to go to get out of the mess we are in… Residential and commercial construction will be covered…the principles are the same but the applications are different.

Environment:  Residential & Commercial

Presentation Level:  Basic, Intermediate

Live-Streamed Online Video

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